Virtual Driving Tour, 09/10/02 (north to south)

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Restoration and Monitoring of Aquatic Quality in a Coal-Mined Watershed By C. A. Cravotta III, M. D. Bilger, R. A. Brightbill, and D. Bogar*

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Seigrist Dam / Highbridge Reservoir

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Swatara State Park By Jo Ellen Litz

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Swatara State Park By Karen R. Light

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Northern Lebanon High School  By Gina Mason

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Growing Greener Grant Partnership between the Swatara Creek Watershed Association and Wenger’s Feed Mill, Inc. By Bill Achor

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Roofed Mortality Composter Larry Martin Farm-Bethel Township By Stephanie Harmon

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Quittapahilla Watershed Success Stories By David Lasky

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Hazel Dyke Flood Control Project AKA Quittapahilla Creek By Stephanie Harmon

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Hershey Dam & Pa American Water Company By Robert Arnold

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Pennsylvania American Water Company

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United Water

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Middletown Dam, Dauphin County By Tom Embich

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Swatara Creek Greenway By Ed Chubb, Director Dauphin County Parks and Recreation Department

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Swatara Water Trail By Jo Ellen Litz

Restoration and Monitoring of Aquatic Quality in a Coal-Mined Watershed By C. A. Cravotta III, M. D. Bilger, R. A. Brightbill, and D. Bogar*

Drainage from flooded, abandoned mines contributes substantially to baseflow in the northern part of Swatara Creek, which drains a 43-mi2 area in the Southern Anthracite Field of eastern Pennsylvania. Metals discharged from the mines are transported as dissolved and particulate forms in Swatara Creek and its mining-affected tributaries and have accumulated in the streambed sediment. Beginning in 1995, a variety of treatment systems and surface reclamation projects were implemented at some of the abandoned mines. At Ravine, Pennsylvania, immediately downstream of the mined area, annual minimum values of pH have increased from acidic to near-neutral and the fish community has rebounded from nonexistent in 1990 to 24 species in 2000 and 2001. Although the majority of the fish species are considered to have moderate tolerance to pollution, several intolerant species including river chub, cutlips minnow, and longnose dace, have been reported since 1997. An increased abundance of benthic macroinvertebrate taxa that are intolerant of pollution indicates water quality improved from fair in 1994 to very good in 1999 and 2000. Nevertheless, recent monitoring indicates elevated concentrations and transport of Fe, Al, Mn, and trace metals during stormflow and elevated concentrations of Fe, Mn, Co, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Zn in streambed sediments relative to unmined areas and to toxicity guidelines for aquatic invertebrates and fish.

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Seigrist Dam / Highbridge Reservoir

At the Swatara Creek Intake in Jonestown, there is potential contamination from nonpoint sources of pollution, mainly from agricultural and urban runoff, which is the primary concern for the Swatara Creek Intake. Segments of the main stem Swatara Creek and several tributaries directly upstream from the intake are included on the 303(d) list for impairment due to nutrient and siltation problems associated with agricultural practices. Point sources of pollution are also present within the drainage area of the intake, but are less of a priority for concern than nonpoint sources of pollution. NPDES permitted industrial discharges and sewage treatment plant discharges are found within the drainage area. These are regulated discharges, with few violations noted in 2000. Numerous gas stations and truck terminals are located in close proximity to the intake, adjacent to Interstates 81 and 78.

Siegrist Dam Intake--The drainage area above the Siegrist Dam is 97% forested, minimizing the concern for contamination of this source. The Swatara Creek Watershed Association supported an elevated status to high-quality stream above the Reservoir. However, nonpoint source pollution associated with acid mine drainage is the main concern for this intake, but according to self-assessment forms received from the City of Lebanon Authority, effects of acid mine drainage are not noted at the intake. BMPs, such as the construction of limestone drains, have been implemented throughout the northern sections of the Swatara Creek Watershed, decreasing the effects of acid mine drainage.

Organizations, such as the League of Women Voters through the Water Resources Education Network (WREN), are being funded to provide support and training for local source water protection programs. Additionally, various groups and projects could receive funding to develop educational materials and promote identified source water protection needs. The SCWA and several sub-watershed groups are very active within the Swatara Creek Watershed. The SCWA has developed a Rivers Conservation Plan to protect and enhance the watershed. These organizations work with government agencies, private businesses and the public to address important issues within the watershed. A Comprehensive Water Resources Study is also in progress for the entire watershed to identify water resource problems and potential solutions.

Municipalities Served by the City of Lebanon Authority include: Lebanon City, Cornwall Borough, Northern Lebanon Township, West Lebanon Township, South Lebanon Township, North Cornwall Township, Jonestown Borough, Cleona Borough.

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Swatara State Park By Jo Ellen Litz

Few people know about the Swatara State Park in south-central Pennsylvania, but the Swatara State Park is valuable for its history and beauty. Tributaries of the Swatara Creek are stocked annually by the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission. It also conveniently embodies a portion of the Appalachian Trail and other hikeable trails. The Department of Conservation and Natural Resources is to be commended for the extensive ongoing public participation process that includes ideas and input from local citizens for development of the Park. Even before completion of the amenities including sorely needed signage and toilets, you might want to try and unearth something Jurassic at the marine fossil beds within the Park.

Swatara State Park, which lies in Swatara, Bethel, and Union Townships in Lebanon County and Pine Grove Township in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, was initially developed as a result of Congressional Project 70. In Project 70, lands were seized for the park through the power of eminent domain. As a result, life-long residents were forced from their homes in order to make way for a park that is still being developed. The park extends 7.6 miles adjacent to Interstate 81 between Green Point and Pine Grove Interchange at PA 443. Acreage totals 3,510 with 2,589 acres in Lebanon and 921 acres in Schuylkill Counties respectively. Even upon completion of Park amenities, a reservoir for water supply is still possible that would assimilate the original "Big Dam" that fed the Union Canal. Average width of the reservoir is proposed to be 120. 0' and maximum depth around 38’. As a result, fishable waters will increase eight fold.

Anxious to have the promises of project 70 fulfilled, Citizen’s Coordinating for Clean Water, the former name of the Swatara Creek Watershed Association, formed when a threat to our public water supply emerged in the form of Pine Grove Landfill. In the process of defending the Commonwealth’s water, we faced a law suit for $10,000,000. Originally defended by Wiley Parker of Henry & Beaver Law Firm, the Civil Liberties Union was eventually successful in getting the slap suit thrown out of court based on our first amendment rights to free speech (a public hearing had been held concerning the permit application). In an effort to make lemonade out of lemons, while the lawsuit was playing out, we worked on an upgrade to the Swatara Creek. This upgrade from 3 to 1A in the Scenic Rivers Program provided recognition by the State of Pennsylvania to segments of a stream that had once been written off as too far gone to rehabilitate. Understanding our need for additional water supply, the Swatara State Park was not included in this upgrade. All this time, a dedicated core group of individuals stuck together and branched out to develop a "Watershed Approach" that continues to encourage improvements to the Swatara Creek—for example, in addition to our yearly canoe and litter clean-ups, sewage upgrades were completed by municipalities, limestone diversion wells and wetlands were installed by the Northern Swatara Watershed Association, and with the help of Conservation Districts, farmers completed best management practices. As stated in our membership brochure, SCWA has not given up on the vision of a lake at Swatara State Park. We are grateful to a group of citizens who have pointed out vernal pools and salamanders within the Park. We value their input and these treasures, and believe we can proceed with the lake and respect these points of view. It appears the droughts of 1999 and 2002 document the overwhelming need for the lake at Swatara State Park. However, knowing that a good idea stands the test of time, we await the outcome of two formal studies by independent organizations. If these studies also document the need for the lake at Swatara State Park, it is imperative that DEP take the lead in coordinating resubmission of an application for completion of the lake. From the (re)start, we should include local citizens as well as EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers who are major players in the issuance of needed permits.

In the interim, through our web site and with "Water Conservation Kits" purchased with a Growing Greener Grant and by looking for grants to implement groundwater recharge projects, SCWA continues to educate the public on ways to conserve water. In addition, to protect native species of plants and animals, SCWA is seeking funding to identify and develop a plan to control invasive species in Swatara State Park. Without implementation of such a plan, even if the lake is not built, we could lose these valuable resources.

Proposed SAFETY FEATURES: Located 1000' upstream from the Appalachian Trail bridge, the proposed breast will be all concrete with a 450' wide spill way and maintain a 3" overflow. This means by maintaining 18.5 cubic feet per second, there will be a better down-stream flow during times of drought. During a 7 day 10 year low flow, the Creek ran 15 cubic feet per second. The breast will be able to withstand 3.3 times the amount of water that was present in Agnes (1972) which was 68,000 cubic feet per second at Harper's. The dam will withstand 25" of rain over a two day period. The Swatara is a flash stream--rising and falling quickly. The multi-level discharge will be along the west bank. In severe drought conditions the level could drop 2', but in normal years, a consistent level will be maintained. Any drop should occur after Labor Day and be back to normal by January. Drawing from 169 square miles of watershed, the dam can fill in as little as one week in the spring high flow or as long as two months during low flow. The reservoir will provide a potential 10,000,000 gallon per day water supply. If other downstream obstructions and a review of spawning habitat are addressed, a fish ladder could go on the west bank. Life expectancy is 376 years when 50% of the dam will fill with sediment. Use is expected to be 300,000 annually after phase 1 day use and 600,000 after phase 2 overnight use.

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Swatara State Park by Karen R. Light

Swatara State Park provides a natural area for enjoyable family recreation throughout the year. The nine-mile Railroad Bed stretching from Lickdale through the Park to Pine Grove, provides a multi-use trail for hiking, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, dogsledding and biking. Horseback riding is permitted on the right side berm of the Park’s public roads.

The old portion of Route 443, which is now closed to traffic, is a super choice for families with children who want a safe place to ride bicycle or use their in-line skates. Using the Waterville walking bridge as an access to the old road, those with physical handicaps are able to enjoy getting out into the park. Hikers on the Appalachian Trail also cross the Waterville Bridge as they head north to Maine or south to Georgia.

The free-flowing Swatara Creek presents a quiet ride for individuals in boats, rafts, canoes, and kayaks while displaying a varied panoramic view of habitats which provide homes for many birds, amphibians, fish, reptiles and mammals. Anglers are attracted to the Swatara Creek, Trout Run and other small streams in the park. In the cold water areas of the streams they may be lucky enough to catch some native brook trout.

An assessment of twenty-two autumnal vernal ponds indicated a variety of amphibians, including wood frogs, gray tree frogs, spring peepers, American toads, marbled and spotted salamanders. Several ponds also hosted invertebrates such as fairy shrimp, mayfly larva, midge larva and small crustacean.

The mature bottomland and upland forested areas provide food, cover, and nesting areas for wood ducks, the American woodcock, ovenbirds, scarlet tanagers, and the wood thrush. Prairie, cerulean, and worm-eating warblers use the park as a stopover during migration.

Hundreds of wildflowers provide color to the landscape throughout the seasons. Finding the myriad of blooms is an interesting treasure hunt and helps one appreciate Rachel Carson’s words "Nature gives to every time and season a beauty of its own". "Kodak moments" abound for the photographers, as they discover pink lady slippers, showy orchis, wood betony, bishop’s cap, cardinal flower, ladies tresses, fringed polygala, and turk’s cap.

The fossil bed along Old State Road is the scene of school field trips, family groups and university professors. The Upper Mahantango formation contains significant marine fossils, which attract collectors.

The historical and archaeological value of the Park, with the remnants of the Old Canal and several locks, the possible Indian Campsites and trails, affords one many hours of interesting explorations.

For the above reasons, I believe Swatara State Park is a Gem! Aldo Leopold wrote "We abuse the land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us. When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect." Let us regard the Swatara State Park with the love and respect it deserves and appreciate it as a free-flowing stream-side Park, a place for family recreation and a "gem of our Commonwealth."

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Northern Lebanon High School By Gina Mason

Northern Lebanon School District, through Growing Greener, is currently installing various Best Management Practices (BMPs).

A dirt and gravel road project and composting toilet have been completed to date. The dirt and gravel road, which leads to the pond, historically created dust clouds due to vehicle travel causing impact on the adjacent stream. The construction of the dirt and gravel road included the installation of two broad-based dips and a French mattress. These are storm water BMPs that allow the flow of water over (broad base dip) and through (French mattress) thus preventing erosion problems.

Future plans include installing a storm-water infiltration trench in place of a sediment basin, which will allow subsurface groundwater recharge. Other planned groundwater recharge BMPs include porous pavement and water gardens. It’s also planed to hydrologically connect the pond to the stream thus improving the health of the stream.

NLSD is also actively involving their students in ongoing watershed educational activities.

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Growing Greener Grant Partnership between the Swatara Creek Watershed Association and Wenger’s Feed Mill, Inc. By Bill Achor

The purpose of this grant is to identify non-point sources of pollution due to agricultural activities typically present on a farm and implement technology to minimize the effects of these sources on the local water bodies. The project involves farms in both Lebanon and Berks Counties and addresses issues typically found on commercial laying hen facilities. Beach Run, Oil Run, Elizabeth Run and several unnamed tributaries of the Little Swatara Creek are the streams that drain these farms and empty into the Swatara Creek which has several stretches of stream that are impaired due to nutrient run-off and sediment. Each farm has constructed ponds that also flowed into the above-mentioned streams.

The project is to demonstrate the implementation of best management practices in the area of manure handling and loading for off farm and on farm use, wash water collection and proper application, installation of grassed waterways and other filter areas, potential riparian buffers where applicable and storm water runoff controls to control the loss of sediment from around the production facilities.

The project has inched forward with the installation of a grassed waterway on the Berks County farm that was installed with CREP funds. This grassed waterway also will act as a filter area between the production site and the farm pond that empties into the unnamed tributary that empties into the Little Swatara Creek. The next phase of the project will be the installation of wash water collection tanks and manure loading pads. The final phase will be to correct the storm water pattern from around the production buildings that flows into the farm pond.

At the farms in Lebanon County, design for the wash water collection systems is almost complete. Bids should be ready for distribution this fall and winter in expectation for a spring 03 start. Manure loading area pads and storm water improvements will follow in the fall 03. CREP funds are available for the installation of filter areas/riparian buffers for the farms in Lebanon County and could potentially affect 40 acres of the two farms.

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Roofed Mortality Composter Larry Martin Farm-Bethel Township By Stephanie Harmon

This farm is a broiler operation on a single tract of land located approximately 0.4 miles from an un-named tributary to the Little Swatara Creek. The broiler operation averages 125,000 birds or 396 AEUs and is a CAO with an approved Act 6 Nutrient Management Plan. This farm also serves as a nursery or farrowing operation for approximately 450 piglets and 400 sows.

Previously the dead birds were composted on an uncovered stack or were incinerated in a container on site. These activities took place in a drainage way that eventually outlets to the Little Swatara Creek. Not only did this have direct impacts on the stream but also could have lead to concerns of biosecurity. The piglets and sows were stacked in an open container until picked up by a rendering facility.

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In recent years, contemporary methods of carcass disposal such as burying carcasses in pits, open land disposal, or incineration, have become more costly, ineffective, and detrimental to our local water supply. Poor locations of facilities, increasing body weights of animals and increasingly expanding operations are magnifying concerns of air pollution and contamination of surface and ground waters in our watersheds. Composting and the use of compost material presents many potential benefits such as:

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Disease control

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The composting process produces heat, driving off moisture and destroying pathogens, which lowers the risk of nuisance complaints

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Improved manure handling and land application with minimal environmental risk

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Improved soil health and fertility

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Minimizes the amount of non-point source pollution to ground water

Larry Martin is now able to biologically treat animal carcasses and manure by composting, which will protect the environment from non-point source runoff. The process of composting stabilizes nutrients, destroys pathogens and produces a low odor, humus-like material. Larry will apply this material to his cropland, which will add organic matter, improve his soil structure and increase infiltration rates resulting in less surface water runoff (carrying soil and nutrients) as well as binding up leachable nitrogen in its organic form. This material reduces the need for fertilizers and the potential for surface runoff. Larry already had the necessary ingredients available (manure, carcasses, straw or an alternative carbon source and water) which makes it inexpensive and simple to implement. Through expenses saved by not rendering, incinerating and applying commercial fertilizers, we expect the composter to pay for itself over time.

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wpe14.jpg (31974 bytes)Quittapahilla Watershed Success Stories By David Lasky

Lebanon Career and Technology Center. The wetlands at this site are near the headwaters of the Quittapahilla Creek. It was imperative to preserve these wetlands for ground water recharge, which can also help to reduce flow that would contribute to flooding of the Hazel Dyke in the City of Lebanon.

An educational pavilion and two wetlands were restored, each being about one acre in size, with the collaboration of the Lebanon County Career and Technology Center, Lebanon County School Districts, Lebanon County Conservation District and local groups. We hope to see the wetlands used by the school districts in Lebanon County to teach the recently State Department of Education mandated standards on wetlands. DEP supervised the restoration of the wetlands.

The Cleona Playground was experiencing significant stream bank erosion. With a group of volunteers, log and stone deflectors were placed along the stream bank on both sides of the stream during Summer, 2001. In Fall, 2001 a group of volunteers planted trees and shrubs along the stream bank. In spring, 2002 another group of volunteers planted live stakes into the stream bank. The Cleona Borough Council gave their approval for the project, which also includes the Cleona Pumping Station. The Borough Council added the protectors around the trees and shrubs. The funds were through DEP.

The Wengert Farms. A group of farms owned by the Wengert’s Dairy were fenced through the Lebanon County Conservation District and DEP. Utilizing nursery stock, the Dairy also planted a riparian buffer.

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Hazel Dyke Flood Control Project AKA Quittapahilla Creek By Stephanie Harmon

Although the city of Lebanon was in dire need of flood control measures after the detrimental damages of Hurricane Agnes, some question whether the Hazel Dyke (the concrete channel which divides Lebanon City), was the best solution for the watershed in its entirety.

Pros:
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Moves the water quickly through the city

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Reduces flooding on the streets of Lebanon City

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Reduces flooding on the properties of the residents who live along the channel

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Stops stream bank erosion, thus reducing sediment load in the stream, which benefits the Chesapeake Bay.

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As a Result of:

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Minimal to no vegetation or natural stream characteristics

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Loss of flood plain

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Unconcerned residents use the channel as a means of trash disposal

Cons:
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The increased velocity allowed by the channel produces detrimental damage to stream banks and properties downstream of the channel

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Increases flooding in North Cornwall Township and further downstream of the channel

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Increases flooding on the property owners of North Cornwall Township and further downstream of the channel

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Due to the lack of vegetation and natural stream characteristics the channel is generally unsuitable for components of a healthy stream habitat (vegetation, macro-invertebrates, fish, amphibians etc).

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Due to the loss of flood plain, there is no chance for infiltration and water returning naturally to the stream system (extremely important in times of drought). Because the water is quickly moved through the channel, in event of another catastrophic storm event, would the lower watershed properties be inundated?

Trash from the channel is moved through the channel during storm events, polluting and smothering the stream system and causing debris jams further downstream.

Solutions…what are they? Challenges…can and will stakeholders work together?

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Hershey Dam & Pa American Water Company By Robert Arnold

The 'Hershey Dam' was originally built in 1932 to provide backwater for speedboat rides along Boathouse Road and to provide cooling water that could be pumped to the chocolate factory for condensors and refrigeration. The withdrawal permit was for 5,000 gpm with the stipulation that the discharge water be returned to the Swatara Creek via Spring Creek.

A classic example of a low-head dam, the Hershey Dam is constructed of reinforced concrete. The spillway height is 8 feet and extends 245 feet across. At a normal flow height of 9 feet, water storage is approximately 22 million gallons or 500 acre-feet. The Dam was largely unaffected by Hurricane Agnes in 1972, but the pumphouse was severely damaged. It was repaired with the pumps being moved up to the roof of the building.

Electricity generation was discontinued at the plant in 1969, and later, in the early '90s, milk condensing was moved to the new West Hershey Plant so that the Dam is no longer needed as a cooling water source. Warning buoys and signs are posted as per PFBC regulation since the Dam is still very popular with fishermen.

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Pennsylvania American Water Company

PA American has an intake located on the Swatara Creek, about 1-mile north of Rt. 39, just north of Hershey, PA. The Manada Creek Intake is located in South Hanover Township, Dauphin County, above the confluence with Swatara Creek. The assessment area encompasses approximately 483 square miles in Schuylkill, Berks, Lebanon, and Dauphin Counties. It covers an area of 40 municipalities. The headwaters region of the Swatara Creek is located in Schuylkill County, just north of US Route 209 in Foster Township. The Manada Creek originates 10 miles upstream of the Hershey Filtration Plant, in the Fort Indiantown Gap Military Reservation. Due to an increase in population in Berks, Lebanon, and Dauphin Counties, an increase in residential development with a decrease in agricultural use is expected throughout the watershed. The main stem of the Swatara Creek in this assessment area is listed in the Chapter 93 Water Quality Standards as cold water fishery (CWF) in Lebanon County and warm water fishery (WWF) in Dauphin County. Manada Creek is designated in the Chapter 93 Water Quality

Standards as a high-quality CWF from the headwaters to Interstate 81, and as a WWF from Interstate 81 to the mouth. The Pa. DEP establishes impaired waterways through its Unassessed Waters Program and Use Attainability studies. The impaired streams are placed on the 303(d) list and submitted to the

USEPA. The Pa. DEP conducted its Unassessed Waters survey in the Swatara Creek Watershed during the summer of 1997.

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United Water

Municipalities Served by the United Water Assessment Area include: Hummelstown Borough, South Hanover Township, Derry Township, Londonderry Township, Lower Swatara Township, Swatara Township, Paxtang Borough

The core issues of the assessment of the Swatara Creek Watershed are similar in nature to those reported under PAWC above. Contamination from point sources is less of a threat because the discharges are regulated. However, there are a considerable amount of NPDES sites within Zone A. Contaminants from these sources include bacteria, nutrients, metals, and disinfectants.

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Middletown Dam, Dauphin County By Tom Embich

The Middletown Dam, officially still owned by Borough of Middletown, is located on the Swatara Creek, Dauphin County upstream of the Route 230 Bridge and downstream of the Turnpike Bridges. The PA Fish & Boat Commission slated the dam for removal, and it is partially breached, allowing for traverse during slightly above normal flows. However, a public out cry because of perceived deflation of property values along the backwater of the dam, and the loss of recreational boating by adjacent residents resulted in the dam remaining. The current concern is not that the dam remains, but the condition around the dam. As a result of concerns for the dangerous hydraulic of such dams the area below the dam has been backfilled with construction debris, mostly concrete rubble, which unfortunately contains rebar rods that rise above the water level during normal and low flows like spikes on some carelessly discarded plank. In addition, because of the local property owners’ concern for the pending removal proposal by the PA Fish & Boat Commission a barrier fence of barbed wire has been constructed along Swatara Road, a road parallel to the creek for most of the impoundment’s length. The road right-of-way overlaps the streambank and therefore the fence is in the right-of-way of the public road, in addition to being in the power company’s easement, which is between the creek and the road. The property owner at the south side of the dam access has also erected a "No Trespassing" barrier and signs to protect his property from unregulated public access. This individual has been amenable to access for organized sojourns of the Swatara, but prior contact is required to secure egress for portage around the dam. During normal and above normal flows it would be possible to traverse the dam except for the dangerous rebar rods in the debris below the dam. Recommendations: (1) Removal of the rebar rods be undertaken as a project during extreme low flow periods to lessen the dangers of passage during above normal flow periods. (2) The barbed wire barrier needs to be removed parallel to Swatara Road, and another egress area along the public right-of-way of the road be established for the casual boater, so that egress across private property at the dam becomes unnecessary.

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Swatara Creek Greenway By Ed Chubb, Director Dauphin County Parks and Recreation Department

In the early to mid 1990s the Swatara Creek in Dauphin County was studied as a Greenway. The County of Dauphin looked at ways to enhance the Creek and its resources. As stated in the Dauphin county 1997 plan the goal of the Greenway effort and the River’s Conservation Plan was to preserve a natural and rural setting along the Swatara providing protection to important natural and cultural resources and opportunities for passive recreation, environmental education and similar non-consumptive uses for local citizens and communities. Since that time many projects have begun to initiate the Greenway effort. Municipalities have secured lands along the Creek as has Manada Conservancy. Hummelstown borough, along the Creek, has begun an ambitious trail and construction of the same in cooperation with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and DCNR, United Water Company and donated materials form Pennsy Supply, Inc. Acquisition of lands for a connecting trail and construction of the same, and the important connection underneath a major railroad bridge of these two trails are planned. At the present time Dauphin County is starting a graphics program designed to help raise the awareness of the Creek and the Greenway effort. Additionally, the County is beginning the task of researching the manner in which lands along the Creek can be preserved through acquisition and easements. More will be done in the future including the reconstruction of a Greenway partnership designed to help guide and promote the Swatara Greenway effort into the 21st century.

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Swatara Water Trail By Jo Ellen Litz

 In the year 2001, the 42-mile Swatara Water Trail running from Jonestown, Lebanon County to Middletown, Dauphin County was officially recognized by the state of Pennsylvania for its recreation, public access, and historical ties. This private-public partnership with landowners, businesses, DCNR, the PA Fish & Boat Commission, Penn DOT, Canaan Valley Institute and SCWA currently has nine formal access points that are marked both by colorful signs and on maps distributed throughout the Watershed. We feel the more people who experience the Creek firsthand, the more people who will be inspired to become stewards of this valuable resource. In the near future, the Trail may be extended through Swatara State Park into Schuylkill County.

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